Our Second Free Dental Day

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June 25, 2014 was an exciting day for me: I was honored to get to serve my community members who had great need for oral health and could not afford it. As early as April 1, 2014, I made the following announcement on my Facebook:

“My dental office will see, free of charge, as many patients as possible starting at 9 a.m. on June 25. The event operates on a first come, first serve basis for oral cancer screenings, and a choice of an extraction, filling or cleaning. Please come to our dental office, located on 1548East St., across from Shasta Regional Hospital on June 25. Please share this to help someone who needs dental care and cannot afford it.”

On our second Free Dental Day there was huge line of more than thirty people waiting since 4:00 AM.

On the morning of June 25, at 9:00 AM my staff and I went out to greet people waiting in line. There was huge line of more than thirty people waiting. Some said they were in line since 4:00AM. My office parking lots, as well as parking lot next door, were fully

On our second Free Dental Day there was huge line of more than thirty people waiting since 4:00 AM.

On the morning of June 25, at 9:00 AM my staff and I went out to greet people waiting in line. There was huge line of more than thirty people waiting. Some said they were in line since 4:00AM. My office parking lots, as well as parking lot next door, were fully packed.

Extra Help

On our second Free Dental Day, I had employed extra help to be able to serve as many people as possible

I had hired extra help to be able to serve as many people as possible. Throughout the day, my staff and I were all running. We were trying to accommodate all the people who had waited patiently, some over 12 hours. There were young, old, teenagers, and children among them. They were badly in need of dental care, which was overdue for years.

extra help

Many people were badly in need of dental care, which was overdue for years.

Many people were badly in need of dental care, which was overdue for years.

You could not believe how many times my staff and I cried for the pain and suffering they had gone through. I was overwhelmed and embarrassed with their expression of gratitude.

We gave away $11,000 worth of free dental services.

 

 

Our Hygienist

At the end of the day we had given away $11000 worth of free dental services.

  Some people die from dental disease

Many people suffer greatly, as the result of unaffordable Healthcare costs.

According to Harvard Gazette, one person dies every 12 minutes (45,000 deaths annually) from un-affordable Healthcare costs. Healthcare is a huge topic – let’s just consider Dental care.

People don’t realize that dental disease can cause serious illness. The problems are not just cosmetic. Many people die from dental disease.

According to NBC affiliate WLWT, a 24 year old man, Kyle Willis, died because of his infected tooth. Kyle’s tooth started hurting two weeks before his death. When he went to dentist, dentists told him his tooth needed to be pulled; he decided to forgo the procedure, because he was unemployed and had no insurance. When his face started swelling and his head began to ache, Willis went to the emergency room, where he received prescriptions for antibiotics and pain medications. Willis couldn’t afford both, so he chose the pain medications. The tooth infection spread, causing his brain to swell. He died as a result.

 

Between 30 and 50 percent of the population have the most serious dental disease

When people are unemployed or don’t have insurance, where do they go? What do they do? People end up dying from the most treatable diseases in the world.

According to  PBS: “More than 100 million Americans don’t go to the dentist because they can’t afford it. Many end up in severe pain and sometimes they even die!”

According to Dr. Tom McGuire , Dental disease is an epidemic. Ninety percent of the population suffers from some form of this disease. Between 30 and 50 percent of the population have the most serious forms of dental

People want to believe there’s a safety net that catches all of these people, and there isn’t.

More than 2.1 million people, with tooth aches go to emergency rooms

Emergency room visits for dental health have doubled from about a decade ago.  Nationally, more than 2.1 million people, the vast majority of them adults, showed up in emergency rooms with dental pain in 2010 — that’s double the number from just a decade prior. The majority of dental emergency room visits, nearly 80 percent, were for preventable conditions such as abscesses and cavities.

All too often emergency departments become the go-to place for treatment even though many visits could be prevented with the right outpatient care at the right time,” said Joan Randell, deputy director of The Nicholson Foundation. “We hope that hospital systems and policymakers consider implementing the recommendations to strengthen the community-based dental safety net.”

Many ER dental visits involve the same patients seeking additional care. In Minnesota, nearly 20 percent of all dental-related ER visits are return trips, the report said. That’s because emergency rooms generally are not staffed by dentists. Doctors might offer pain relief and medicine for infected gums, but not much more for dental patients. And many patients are unable to find or afford follow-up treatment, so they end up back in the emergency room.

I think emergency departments should have a dental chair and a dentist on call.

Thousands of dentists across the country and I see patients who are struggling financially and have put off regular dental care. The result is that people are living with infection and pain, and it’s impacting their health and quality of life.

A Report of the Surgeon General indicates that people with low income and racial and ethnic minorities are particularly vulnerable.

 

Less than 1% of dental services are covered by Medicare

Neither Medicare nor the Affordable Care Act includes adult dental coverage, although some pediatric dental care is covered. Even the Medigap insurance that adults buy to expand their plans’ benefits still won’t cover dental procedures. Less than 1% of dental services are covered by Medicare.

Education is Key

Your teeth can last a lifetime if you practice basic dental care, which involves brushing and flossing regularly, eating a mouth-healthy diet, and visiting your dentist and/or dental hygienist for regular checkups and cleanings.

The problem is that most of us are not familiar with ‘mouth-healthy diet”

Changes begin in your mouth the minute you start to eat certain foods. After eating sugar-containing foods, carbohydrates, along with bacteria in your mouth, you begin to make acids. When you eat ferment-able carbohydrates – foods containing sugar — the bacteria in your mouth use the sugar for fuel and produce acids as a waste product.  Acidic media in your mouth can dissolve enamel in less than five minutes. Regular acid assaults on enamel can wear holes in teeth, commonly called

 

Eating foods containing sugar help fast multiplication of bacteria

In addition to cavity formation, eating foods containing sugar help fast multiplication of bacteria which use carbohydrate as fuel. These bacteria then colonize and attach themselves to the tooth’s smooth surface. This results to dental plaque formation. Dental plaque is a biofilm, usually a pale yellow filmthat develops on the teeth.

 

Dental plaque results to Calculus formation

Continual accumulation of minerals from saliva on plaque, results in calculus or tartar formation which is a form of hardened plaque. Levels of calculus and location of formation varies from one person to another, and are affected by oral hygiene habits, access to professional care, diet, age, ethnic origin, time since last dental cleaning, systemic disease, and the use of prescription medications.

 

Calculus formations results in periodontal diseases

A build-up of plaque and calculus can lead to inflamed and infected gums. Mild gum disease is called gingivitis and is not usually serious; however this condition is a predisposition to the start of periodontitis. More severe gum disease, called periodontitis, can lead to teeth falling out. This condition, simply put, is the loss of tooth supporting structures, (bone and gum support).

 

Periodontal diseases can result to heart attack and stroke

Because periodontal disease is a bacterial infection, periodontal bacteria can enter the blood stream and travel to major organs and begin new infections. Both the heart and the brain are some of the most susceptible organs.

“A lot of studies suggest that oral health, and gum disease in particular, are related to serious conditions like heart disease,” says periodontist Sally Cram, DDS, a spokeswoman for the American Dental Association.

According to the Academy of Periodontology, people with periodontal disease are almost twice as likely to have coronary artery disease (also called heart disease). And one study found that the presence of common problems in the mouth, including gum disease (gingivitis), cavities, and missing teeth, were as good at predicting heart disease as cholesterol levels . Periodontal disease has also been linked to stroke.   Latest studies showed possible link between Alzheimer disease and periodontal disease.

Bottom Line:

 

If you like to keep good oral health do the followings:

 

1)  Brush twice a day and floss at least once a day regularly.

 

2) See your dentist every six months for dental hygiene and checkup.

 

3) Eatmouth-healthy Food. Avoid sugary, starchy food and alcoholic drinks. These create a favorable environment for oral bacterial growth.  They also have a drying effect, which reduces saliva flow and allows foul-smelling bacteria to linger longer.

 

4) If you have to eat sugary food, coffee, starchy food, and alcoholic drinks make sure to rinse your mouth with a mouth wash or water immediately after. There is a product on the market that targets only the bad bacteria in the mouth. It’s called EvoraPlus and it works great.

 

There is a definite need to give assistance to those less fortunate. We look forward to another successful event next time and will keep the public up to date with what is to come in the future.

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In dentistry experience and Continuing Education are everything. Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in practicing General Dentistry and 25 years in Orthodontics. She has thousands of hours of advanced training. In 2000, Academy of General Dentistry awarded Dr. Carter a Certificate of Mastership (MAGD) in General Dentistry. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement. Dr. Carter is a Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 500 patients with Invisalign. For more information please visit www.drparvincarer.com

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Wine is Good for Your Dental Health

Dr. Parvin Carter

Cheers! That glass of red wine you pour each day to enhance your heart health or overall health may also be helping to keep your mouth healthy by inhibiting tooth decay and gum disease.

Wine could  prevent cavities

For anyone searching for another reason to enjoy a glass of red wine with dinner, here’s a good one: A new study has found that red wine, as well as grape seed extract, could potentially help prevent cavities. They say that their report, which appears in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, could lead to the development of natural products that ward off dental diseases with fewer side effects.

60 to 90 percent of the global population suffer from gum disease 

M. Victoria Moreno-Arribas and colleagues explain that dental diseases are extremely common throughout the world. Cavities, periodontal disease and tooth loss affect an estimated 60 to 90 percent of the global population. The problems start when certain bacteria in the mouth get together and form biofilms, which are communities of bacteria that are difficult to kill. They form plaque and produce acid, which starts damaging teeth. Brushing, fluoride in toothpaste and water and other methods can help get rid of bacterial plaques, but the effects are limited.

Antimicrobial agents reduce taste perception

Antimicrobial agents can be prescribed to control plaque and reduce oral biofilms, but side effects are associated with some of these, including reduced taste perception and discoloration of the gums. Also, it is possible that the use of these antimicrobials is contributing to drug resistance in the bacteria.

Some research has suggested that polyphenols, grape seed extract and wine can slow bacterial growth, so Moreno-Arribas’ team decided to test them under realistic conditions for the first time.

Wine and human health

Wine contains a number of biologically active compounds with beneficial effects on human health. The antibacterial action of commercial red and white wines against oral bacteria responsible for caries development and sore throat was studied.. Both wines displayed activity. The compounds responsible for such activities were succinic, malic, lactic, tartaric, citric, and acetic acid. The synthetic mixtures of the organic acids tested at the concentrations found in wine had greater antibacterial activity than the beverages.

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In dentistry experience and Continuing Education are everything. Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in Practicing General Dentistry and 25 years in Orthodontics. She has thousands of hours of advanced training. In 2000, Academy of General Dentistry awarded Dr. Carter a Certificate of Mastership (MAGD) in General Dentistry. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement. Dr. Carter is a Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 450 patients with Invisalign.

see www.parvincarter.com for more information.

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The Benefit of Oil Pulling

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 Oil-pulling therapy involves swishing  a tablespoon of cold pressed organic sesame oil, or coconut ,sunflower, olive oil in the mouth for as long as 10 to 15 minutes and then spitting it out. It is part of a traditional alternative medicine called Ayurveda that originated in India.

The roots of oil pulling go deep, and it is referenced in the Charaka Saṃhitā, a foundation text of Ayurveda. Ayurveda is an ancient healing system that originated in India at least 5,000 years ago. Ayurvedic medicine is a system of traditional medicine native to the Indian subcontinent and a form of alternative medicine

Claimed Benefits for Your Mouth

Overall strengthening of the teeth and gums and jaws
• Prevention of diseases of the gums and mouth, such as cavities and gingivitis
• Prevention for bad breath
• Potential holistic remedy for bleeding gums
• Prevention of dryness of the lips, mouth and throat
• Possible holistic treatment for TMJ and generalreness in the jaw area

Claimed Benefits Beyond Mouth


. Deepak Chopra is an advocate of oil pulling and advises in his book, “Perfect Health,” to begin one’s day by swishing sunflower, coconut, sesame or olive oil. After it’s absorbed through the tongue, the detoxifying oil makes its way through the body, according to Chopra’s 2001 book, “Perfect Health.”

Today, many holistic practitioners believe:

  • help the lymphatic system of the body
  •  preventative health measure for many other conditions.
  • Migraine headache relief
  • • Correcting hormone imbalances
  • • Reducing inflammation of arthritis
  • • May help with gastro-enteritis
  • • Aids in the reduction of eczema
  • • May reduce symptoms of bronchitis
  • • Helps support normal kidney function
  • • May help reduce sinus congestion
  • • Some people report improved vision
  • • Helps reduce insomnia
  • • Reduced hangover after alcohol consumption
  • • Aids in reducing pain
  • • Reduces the symptoms of allergies
  • • Helps detoxify the body of harmful metals and organisms

Is There a Scientific Studies to Support Benefits of  Oil Pulling?

Dr. Sharath Asokan, BDS, MDS, PhD, a professor at the department of pediatric dentistry at Meenakshi Ammal Dental College in Chennai, India, says:

“Within limited available literature and as a person working in Oil Pulling area for close to a decade, I am convinced this works.”

In a study that investigated the impact of oil pulling on microorganisms in biofilm models, Thai researchers from the Faculty of Dentistry at Mahidol University in Bangkok employed coconut oil, corn oil, rice bran oil, palm oil, sesame oil, sunflower oil, and soy bean oil (Asia Journal of Public Health, May-August 2011, Vol. 2:2, pp. 62-66). They found that “coconut oil exhibited antimicrobial activity against S. mutans and [Candidaalbicans,” they wrote. “Sesame oil had antibacterial activity against S. mutans whereas sunflower oil had antifungal activity against C. albicans. Their study provided enough data for the researchers to conclude that “oil-pulling therapy with some edible oils could be used as a preventive home therapy to maintain oral hygiene, especially in developing countries.”

Those researchers found that oil pulling with sunflower oil reduced plaque scores after 45 days. Dr. Asokan had found support for the technique’s ability to reduce plaque (Indian J Dent Res, January-March 2009, Vol. 20:1, pp. 47-51).

He also found that it can have an impact on Bad breath, medically called halitosis (Journal of Indian Society of Pedodontics & Preventive Dentistry, April-June 2011, Vol. 29:2, pp. 90-94).

What is the Position of American Dental Association, ADA,  on Oil Pulling?

When  invited for an interview on this issue,  ADA responded that it  has no opinion on the matter and that it cannot comment on oil pulling because additional research is needed.

What is safe to believe?

While there are many Eastern studies, particularly from India, it appears as though the Western world has yet to put oil pulling’s effect on oral health to the test.

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In dentistry experience and Continuing Education are everything. Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in Practicing General Dentistry and 25 years in Orthodontics. She has thousands of hours of advanced training. In 2000, Academy of General Dentistry awarded Dr. Carter a Certificate of Mastership (MAGD) in General Dentistry. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement. Dr. Carter is a Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 425 patients with Invisalign. For more information please check www.drparvincarter.com

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12 Diseases and One Simple Solution

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A new Gallup poll has revealed that 1 in 3 adults in the United States have not visited the dentist within the past year – a trend that has stayed mostly the same since 2008.

These findings are based on interviews with 178,072 American adults conducted during 2013 and with 354,645 adults conducted during 2008 as part of the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index. Respondents were asked whether they had visited the dentist in the previous 12 months. Results for all years between 2008 and 2013 are similar.

Poor oral health and 12 killer diseases

Poor oral care can lead to many potential negative health outcomes. Recent medical research has indicated that when combined with other risk factors, poor oral health may be linked to :

 Connection found between poor dental health and depression

Recently Deakin University researchers reported a connection between poor dental health and depression.

Using data from a comprehensive health survey of more than 10,000 people aged 20—75 years living in the United States, the Deakin IMPACT Strategic Research Centre, found that poor dental health (as measured by the number of dental conditions a person had) increased the likelihood of being depressed.

“Not only did we find a connection between dental health and depression, we also demonstrated that the more dental conditions one had the greater the severity of their depression,” said Deakin’s Dr. Adrienne O’Neil.

 Inflammatory disorder causes systemic diseases

The report explained  Depression being caused by inflammatory disorder.Poor dental health, which is a source of inflammation, had not been investigated extensively, before this work,  in the context of its links with mental health.The results of this study are published in the online version of the journal General Hospital Psychiatry.

The diseases mentioned above are systematic. Recent research demonstrates that inflammation may be responsible for the association of Oral health and systematic diseases. Therefore, treating inflammation may not only help manage gum diseases but may also help with the management of other chronic inflammatory conditions.

The oral cavity might well be thought of as the window to the body

The oral cavity might well be thought of as the window to the body as oral manifestations accompany many systemic diseases.Three mechanisms or pathways linking oral infections to secondary systemic was studied recently.

The conclusion was Gum disease as a major oral infection may affect the host’s susceptibility to systemic disease such as disease discussed above.

In recent studies, Gum bleeding was associated with higher LDL cholesterol and systolic blood pressure.

The May 2000 U.S. Surgeon General’s Report on Health states, “You cannot be healthy without oral health. Oral health and general health should not be interpreted as separate entities.”

The American Dental Association recommends adults visit a dentist at least once a year and the survey found one-third of U.S. adults did not meet this minimum level of dental care.

There are more than 120 medical conditions – many of them life-threatening – that can be detected in the early stages by a dentist, including thyroid problems, high blood pressure, asthma, sleep and breathing disorders, skin rashes, bruxism (teeth grinding), HIV, tuberculosis, drug abuse, anorexia, digestive disorders and upper respiratory problems.

In recent studies done by Garry Souffrant, MD, of the UT Health Science Center in San Antonio,the following conclusion was made:

“Looking for other types of disease during a primary care visit with patients seeking a dental referral may create an opportunity to catch undiagnosed health problems, researchers reported here.”

What can you do?

Maintenance of good oral health through regular dental visits and appropriate treatment of gum problems is critical for people with any of these health conditions. You can play a major role in preventing gum disease and improving your oral and overall health by:

  • Brushing for two to three minutes, twice a day, with fluoridated toothpaste. Be sure to brush along the gum line.
  • Flossing daily to remove plaque from places your toothbrush can’t reach.
  • Eating a healthy diet to provide essential nutrients (vitamins A and C, in particular).
  • Avoiding cigarettes and smokeless tobacco.
  • Carefully following your physician’s and dentist’s instructions about health care, including using prescription medications, such as antibiotics, as directed.
  • Treating dental infections immediately.
  • Sharing your complete medical history, including any medications you are currently taking, with your dentist.
  • Limiting your alcohol intake.
  • Calling your dentist to make an appointment to have your teeth professionally cleaned.

You can also educate yourself about the relationship between oral and overall health by subscribing to our e-mail list to receive our educational blogs monthly.

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In dentistry experience and Continuing Education are everything. Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in Practicing General Dentistry and 25 years in Orthodontics. She has thousands of hours of advanced training. In 2000, Academy of General Dentistry awarded Dr. Carter a Certificate of Mastership (MAGD) in General Dentistry. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement. Dr. Carter is a Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 400 patients with Invisalign. For more information please check www.drparvincarter.com

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Chocolate to Replace Fluoride?

“Chocolate Toothpaste? Extract of Tasty Treat Could Fight Tooth Decay.”

That’s how Tulane University’s news office provocatively titled a press release in 2007 .

Doesn’t it sound sweet?  The extract, Theobromine, is a constituent of a number of plants, including the beans used to make chocolate. A chemical cousin to caffeine, just like caffeine Theobromine is also a stimulant.


Previous to Tulane University announcement,  BBC News had reported:

A study carried out by researchers at Osaka University in Japan found that parts of the cocoa bean, the main ingredient of chocolate,prevents mouth bacteria and tooth decay.

Speaking to New Scientist magazine, Takashi Ooshima, from Osaka University, said their findings could lead to new treatments for tooth decay.

“It may be possible to use cocoa bean husk extract in a mouthwash, or supplement it to a toothpaste.”

They discovered that the cocoa bean husk – the outer part of the bean which usually goes to waste in chocolate production – has an anti-bacterial effect on the mouth and can fight effectively against plaque and other damaging agents.

Theobromine for Teeth
After a chain of events initiated by Hurricane Katrina,one of the graduate students of Tulane University, Arman Sadegh pour decided to reconnect with his high school mentor, Tetsuo Nakamoto,DDS, PhD. Sadeghpour, after this visit,  shifted his graduate research to continue the work done by Nakamoto.

Nakamoto had found that while caffeine adversely affects teeth, its fellow
methylated xanthine, Theobromine, strengthened tooth enamel.
Sadeghpour decided to expand Nakamoto’s studies. He worked on the effects of Theobromine on human teeth, and  compared Theobromine anti-cavity proprieties with fluoride.

Arman Sadeghpour successfully completed his doctoral thesis on this project.

 

Recetly, Nov 26, 2013, he presented his work in American Dental Association (ADA) Annual Session. He said that his research showed that :

“Theobromine protected teeth from decay better than fluoride.The amount of Theobromine in a one ounce dark chocolate bar has a better effect on tooth hardness than a 1.1% prescription sodium fluoride treatment,” said Sadeghpour.

“While fluoride is an effective enamel strengthener, the federal government issued a mandate to reduce the amount of fluoride in drinking water by 30%. This was due to reports of overexposure in children. Also, as previously mentioned, since high doses can irritate the gastrointestinal tract, some refuse fluoride treatments at the dentist’s office. Conversely, Theobromine was found to be readily absorbed by the gut, metabolized and cleared cleanly by humans”. “Dentists are excited to have an alternative to fluoride” said Sadeghpour.

There are also some research which support the idea that The fluoride exposure in drinking water could affect children Intelligence.

Arman Sadeghpour, PhD, is now President and Chief Executive Officer of Theodent, the company who is producing and distributing Theodent Chocolate Tooth Pate.

Although Theodent is expensive,however, Proctor Gamble, the makers of Crest toothpaste, felt threatened enough to produce a chocolate tasting toothpaste. CNBC recently  did a survey called  “Chocolate-flavored toothpaste put to the test“. You could see people’s view on this here.

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In dentistry experience and Continuing Education are everything. Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in Practicing General Dentistry and 25 years in Orthodontics. She has thousands of hours of advanced training. In 2000, Academy of General Dentistry awarded Dr. Carter a Certificate of Mastership (MAGD) in General Dentistry. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement. Dr. Carter is a Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 400 patients with Invisalign.For more information please see www.drparvincarter.com

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Hitler had a Fear of Going to the Dentist!

Dr. Parvin Carter
Hitler was known to hate the dentist!
 

The future Führer of Nazi Germany was known to hate the dentist.
A postcard sent during the First World War by Adolf Hitler after a visit to the dentist – in which he claimed to have had 19 teeth removed – has turned up in Munich.

‘You can’t imagine how nice I looked,’ he wrote to a fellow soldier called Karl Lanzhammer who was stationed in France. ‘Now I’m better.’

The card, dated December 21, 1916, has been authenticated after it was found in the collection of a postcard collector.

On the front of the card is a picture of Berlin’s Landwehr Canal and it is marked with the stamp of the 2nd Bavarian Infantry Regiment, Hitler’s unit at the time.

 

Some patients have such a fear of dentists that they avoid making dental appointments at all, or cancel appointments they do make. They usually tell me they’ve “always” been afraid of dentists. There are several things you can try to overcome this fear:

Find a Good Dentist for You. Finding a dentist who is sympathetic and understands that you are anxious and will work with you will increase your comfort. You need to feel at ease with your dentist if you want to overcome your fears, and your dentist needs to know what you fear and how they may be able to help you. Good communication also means things like rapport, body language, and using non-threatening language that you can understand. Rapport (a harmonious connection) also implies a relationship of equals, where you don’t perceive your dentist as a threatening or a condescending figure, but as a partner in your care. Communication means that you do things together with your dentist, rather than your dentist doing things to you.

Many dentists offer practices specifically targeted towards fearful people and offer a variety of solutions that may include sedation, and lots of reassurance.

Step by Step you don’t have to do it all at once. Schedule an examination so you can meet the dentist. Then come back for a cleaning. A couple of successful, low stress experiences, will help you cope.

Breath slowly, hold your breath a bit and then slowly exhale.. If you feel you are having an anxiety attack it helps to breath deeply from your stomach than from the chest to the stomach.

Set a date after your dentist appointment to do something fun. Or, reward yourself if you think you have overcome your fear.

Muscle relaxation. Progressive muscle relaxation involves tensing and then releasing one group of muscles at a time. It can help to slow heart rate and promote calmness. Just a few minutes of progressive muscle relaxation may help during an appointment.

Distraction. Focusing your mind elsewhere is another way to lessen anxiety and pain. The more complicated the task, the better. Listening to music may help. But counting tiles on the ceiling or slats on a window blind may be even more effective.

Click on the picture below to learn more about Dr. Parvin Carter and the office!

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In dentistry experience and Continuing Education are everything. Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in Practicing General Dentistry and 25 years in Orthodontics. She has thousands of hours of advanced training. In 2000, Academy of General Dentistry awarded Dr. Carter a Certificate of Mastership (MAGD) in General Dentistry. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement. Dr. Carter is a Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 400 patients with Invisalign. For more information please check www.drparvincarter.com

requestfree consult

 

 

Do You Get a Lot of Headaches?

 

Dr. Parvin Carter

According to the National Headache Foundation, over 45 million Americans suffer from chronic, recurring headaches and of these, 28 million suffer from migraines. About 20% of children and adolescents also experience significant headaches. There are many different types of headaches.

Cluster Headaches

Cluster headaches are relatively uncommon, but these headaches cause excruciating, sharp-as-knife pain around one eye. Attacks occur daily in clusters of weeks or months, then disappear completely for months or years. They are four times more common in men than women, and typically start before age 30. See your doctor if you think you have a cluster headache.

Rebound Headache

Rebound headaches occur in less than 2% of patients whose persistent headache pain causes them to overuse headache medication. These headaches may worsen with physical or mental exertion. Talk to your doctor if you feel that you may be experiencing these headaches.

Sinus Headache

Sinus headaches are headaches with a deep and constant pain in the cheekbones, forehead, or bridge of the nose. This pain usually intensifies with sudden head movement or straining and is usually accompanied by symptoms such as fever, runny nose, and clogged ears. tension headaches and migraine headaches are most common. Since these two types of headaches may be treated differently, determining which type you have is a critical step in pain relief.

Tension Headache

Tension headaches are sometimes called muscle contraction headaches. The pain is usually a dull ache on both sides of the head and has been described as feeling like a tight band across the front of the head. It is also associated with stiffness of the neck/shoulder and frequent pain.

Migraine Headache

Migraine headaches produce moderate to severe pounding or throbbing pain, common on one side of the head. Migraine pain is often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, dizziness, and sensitivity to light and/or sounds.

TMJ Migraine Headache:

If you suffer with complaints of migraine or other headache pain, I would like to make you aware of one basic scientific fact that is undeniable: TMJ or jaw joint dysfunction, is the major cause of your suffering. Your doctors, including neurologist, have simply not received the dental training required to be able to diagnose TMJ problems and how they relate to your migraine or headache pain. That is the main reason there is so much skepticism about TMJ treatment from the medical profession. Physicians just don’t know enough about it. Furthermore, many dentists jump on the bandwagon thinking that they can cure these ailments, only to find that they lack the skill and experience to get the job done.

Symptoms of TMJ Migraine Headache:

How are TMJ migraine patients evaluated? Dental and medical evaluation,clinical exam, including examination of chewing muscles and other related muscle to the joints. Observing patient’s difficulty of the opening the mouth and chewing. Diagnostic dental x-rays and medical x-rays of the joints.  Lateral skull x-rays with analysis to determine the skeletal component of the joint.

Night Guards: Some dentists use night guards to treat TMJ. My studies have shown that use of night guard does not help  TMJ headaches, but it will exacerbate the symptoms and does not offer any solution to the cause.

I believe use of night guards does not help TMJ headaches, but it will exacerbate the symptoms

Successful Treatment Options for TMJ Disorder:

First line of defense is to seek help with a dentist whom has extensive training, continuous studies and experience on this area. Treatment is customized for the individual patient with definitive diagnosis. Every patient has a different degree of the derangement of the TMJ Disorder.Most important is to diagnose and come up with a treatment plan to that diagnosis.

If you suspect that you might have TMJ Migraine, I would be glad to examine you, to see if this is in deed the case and plan a treatment for you. This examination would be free of charge to you.

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In dentistry experience and Continuing Education are everything. Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in Practicing General Dentistry and 25 years in Orthodontics. She has thousands of hours of advanced training. In 2000, Academy of General Dentistry awarded Dr. Carter a Certificate of Mastership (MAGD) in General Dentistry. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement. Dr. Carter is a Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 400 patients with Invisalign.To find out more please see www.parvincarter.com

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