Our Second Free Dental Day

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June 25, 2014 was an exciting day for me: I was honored to get to serve my community members who had great need for oral health and could not afford it. As early as April 1, 2014, I made the following announcement on my Facebook:

“My dental office will see, free of charge, as many patients as possible starting at 9 a.m. on June 25. The event operates on a first come, first serve basis for oral cancer screenings, and a choice of an extraction, filling or cleaning. Please come to our dental office, located on 1548East St., across from Shasta Regional Hospital on June 25. Please share this to help someone who needs dental care and cannot afford it.”

On our second Free Dental Day there was huge line of more than thirty people waiting since 4:00 AM.

On the morning of June 25, at 9:00 AM my staff and I went out to greet people waiting in line. There was huge line of more than thirty people waiting. Some said they were in line since 4:00AM. My office parking lots, as well as parking lot next door, were fully

On our second Free Dental Day there was huge line of more than thirty people waiting since 4:00 AM.

On the morning of June 25, at 9:00 AM my staff and I went out to greet people waiting in line. There was huge line of more than thirty people waiting. Some said they were in line since 4:00AM. My office parking lots, as well as parking lot next door, were fully packed.

Extra Help

On our second Free Dental Day, I had employed extra help to be able to serve as many people as possible

I had hired extra help to be able to serve as many people as possible. Throughout the day, my staff and I were all running. We were trying to accommodate all the people who had waited patiently, some over 12 hours. There were young, old, teenagers, and children among them. They were badly in need of dental care, which was overdue for years.

extra help

Many people were badly in need of dental care, which was overdue for years.

Many people were badly in need of dental care, which was overdue for years.

You could not believe how many times my staff and I cried for the pain and suffering they had gone through. I was overwhelmed and embarrassed with their expression of gratitude.

We gave away $11,000 worth of free dental services.

 

 

Our Hygienist

At the end of the day we had given away $11000 worth of free dental services.

  Some people die from dental disease

Many people suffer greatly, as the result of unaffordable Healthcare costs.

According to Harvard Gazette, one person dies every 12 minutes (45,000 deaths annually) from un-affordable Healthcare costs. Healthcare is a huge topic – let’s just consider Dental care.

People don’t realize that dental disease can cause serious illness. The problems are not just cosmetic. Many people die from dental disease.

According to NBC affiliate WLWT, a 24 year old man, Kyle Willis, died because of his infected tooth. Kyle’s tooth started hurting two weeks before his death. When he went to dentist, dentists told him his tooth needed to be pulled; he decided to forgo the procedure, because he was unemployed and had no insurance. When his face started swelling and his head began to ache, Willis went to the emergency room, where he received prescriptions for antibiotics and pain medications. Willis couldn’t afford both, so he chose the pain medications. The tooth infection spread, causing his brain to swell. He died as a result.

 

Between 30 and 50 percent of the population have the most serious dental disease

When people are unemployed or don’t have insurance, where do they go? What do they do? People end up dying from the most treatable diseases in the world.

According to  PBS: “More than 100 million Americans don’t go to the dentist because they can’t afford it. Many end up in severe pain and sometimes they even die!”

According to Dr. Tom McGuire , Dental disease is an epidemic. Ninety percent of the population suffers from some form of this disease. Between 30 and 50 percent of the population have the most serious forms of dental

People want to believe there’s a safety net that catches all of these people, and there isn’t.

More than 2.1 million people, with tooth aches go to emergency rooms

Emergency room visits for dental health have doubled from about a decade ago.  Nationally, more than 2.1 million people, the vast majority of them adults, showed up in emergency rooms with dental pain in 2010 — that’s double the number from just a decade prior. The majority of dental emergency room visits, nearly 80 percent, were for preventable conditions such as abscesses and cavities.

All too often emergency departments become the go-to place for treatment even though many visits could be prevented with the right outpatient care at the right time,” said Joan Randell, deputy director of The Nicholson Foundation. “We hope that hospital systems and policymakers consider implementing the recommendations to strengthen the community-based dental safety net.”

Many ER dental visits involve the same patients seeking additional care. In Minnesota, nearly 20 percent of all dental-related ER visits are return trips, the report said. That’s because emergency rooms generally are not staffed by dentists. Doctors might offer pain relief and medicine for infected gums, but not much more for dental patients. And many patients are unable to find or afford follow-up treatment, so they end up back in the emergency room.

I think emergency departments should have a dental chair and a dentist on call.

Thousands of dentists across the country and I see patients who are struggling financially and have put off regular dental care. The result is that people are living with infection and pain, and it’s impacting their health and quality of life.

A Report of the Surgeon General indicates that people with low income and racial and ethnic minorities are particularly vulnerable.

 

Less than 1% of dental services are covered by Medicare

Neither Medicare nor the Affordable Care Act includes adult dental coverage, although some pediatric dental care is covered. Even the Medigap insurance that adults buy to expand their plans’ benefits still won’t cover dental procedures. Less than 1% of dental services are covered by Medicare.

Education is Key

Your teeth can last a lifetime if you practice basic dental care, which involves brushing and flossing regularly, eating a mouth-healthy diet, and visiting your dentist and/or dental hygienist for regular checkups and cleanings.

The problem is that most of us are not familiar with ‘mouth-healthy diet”

Changes begin in your mouth the minute you start to eat certain foods. After eating sugar-containing foods, carbohydrates, along with bacteria in your mouth, you begin to make acids. When you eat ferment-able carbohydrates – foods containing sugar — the bacteria in your mouth use the sugar for fuel and produce acids as a waste product.  Acidic media in your mouth can dissolve enamel in less than five minutes. Regular acid assaults on enamel can wear holes in teeth, commonly called

 

Eating foods containing sugar help fast multiplication of bacteria

In addition to cavity formation, eating foods containing sugar help fast multiplication of bacteria which use carbohydrate as fuel. These bacteria then colonize and attach themselves to the tooth’s smooth surface. This results to dental plaque formation. Dental plaque is a biofilm, usually a pale yellow filmthat develops on the teeth.

 

Dental plaque results to Calculus formation

Continual accumulation of minerals from saliva on plaque, results in calculus or tartar formation which is a form of hardened plaque. Levels of calculus and location of formation varies from one person to another, and are affected by oral hygiene habits, access to professional care, diet, age, ethnic origin, time since last dental cleaning, systemic disease, and the use of prescription medications.

 

Calculus formations results in periodontal diseases

A build-up of plaque and calculus can lead to inflamed and infected gums. Mild gum disease is called gingivitis and is not usually serious; however this condition is a predisposition to the start of periodontitis. More severe gum disease, called periodontitis, can lead to teeth falling out. This condition, simply put, is the loss of tooth supporting structures, (bone and gum support).

 

Periodontal diseases can result to heart attack and stroke

Because periodontal disease is a bacterial infection, periodontal bacteria can enter the blood stream and travel to major organs and begin new infections. Both the heart and the brain are some of the most susceptible organs.

“A lot of studies suggest that oral health, and gum disease in particular, are related to serious conditions like heart disease,” says periodontist Sally Cram, DDS, a spokeswoman for the American Dental Association.

According to the Academy of Periodontology, people with periodontal disease are almost twice as likely to have coronary artery disease (also called heart disease). And one study found that the presence of common problems in the mouth, including gum disease (gingivitis), cavities, and missing teeth, were as good at predicting heart disease as cholesterol levels . Periodontal disease has also been linked to stroke.   Latest studies showed possible link between Alzheimer disease and periodontal disease.

Bottom Line:

 

If you like to keep good oral health do the followings:

 

1)  Brush twice a day and floss at least once a day regularly.

 

2) See your dentist every six months for dental hygiene and checkup.

 

3) Eatmouth-healthy Food. Avoid sugary, starchy food and alcoholic drinks. These create a favorable environment for oral bacterial growth.  They also have a drying effect, which reduces saliva flow and allows foul-smelling bacteria to linger longer.

 

4) If you have to eat sugary food, coffee, starchy food, and alcoholic drinks make sure to rinse your mouth with a mouth wash or water immediately after. There is a product on the market that targets only the bad bacteria in the mouth. It’s called EvoraPlus and it works great.

 

There is a definite need to give assistance to those less fortunate. We look forward to another successful event next time and will keep the public up to date with what is to come in the future.

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In dentistry experience and Continuing Education are everything. Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in practicing General Dentistry and 25 years in Orthodontics. She has thousands of hours of advanced training. In 2000, Academy of General Dentistry awarded Dr. Carter a Certificate of Mastership (MAGD) in General Dentistry. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement. Dr. Carter is a Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 500 patients with Invisalign. For more information please visit www.drparvincarer.com

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5 Simple Steps to Preventing 7 Fatal Diseases

 

Dr. Parvin Carter

There are more bacteria living in our mouth than there are people living on earth.Without proper oral hygiene, bacteria can reach levels that might lead to these diseases:

It’s never too late to start to take care of your teeth and gums. With proper care, your teeth and gums can stay healthy throughout your life.

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Watch our typical dental cleaning appointment

If you like to reduce visiting your dentist do the followings:

1)  Brush twice a day.
2) Floss at least once a day regularly.
3) See your dentist every six months for dental hygiene and check up.
4) Eat  mouth-healthy food. Avoid sugary, starchy food, coffee and alcoholic drinks. These create a favorable environment for oral bacterial growth.  They also have a drying effect, which reduces saliva flow and allows foul-smelling bacteria to linger longer.
5) If you have to eat sugary food, coffee, starchy food, and alcoholic drinks make sure to rinse your mouth with a mouth wash within few minutes .  Starches  are simple carbohydrates and can linger in your mouth and then break down into simple sugars. Bacteria feed on sugars and produce acid, which damage  tooth enamel and cause tooth decay.

There is  a product on the market that targets only the bad bacteria in the mouth. It’s called EvoraPlus and it works great .

Bottom Line:

  1. Brush twice a day
  2. Floss at least once a day.
  3. Eat mouth healthy food
  4. Visiting the dentist/dental hygienist at least every six months
  5. Rinse,within few minutes,  with a mouth wash after eating sugary food, coffee, starchy food, alcoholic drinks.

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In dentistry experience and Continuing Education are everything. Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in Practicing General Dentistry and 25 years in Orthodontics. She has thousands of hours of advanced training. In 2000, Academy of General Dentistry awarded Dr. Carter a Certificate of Mastership (MAGD) in General Dentistry. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement. Dr. Carter is a Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 380 patients with Invisalign.

Did you enjoy this blog? if yes would you send it to a friend please?

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Dental Patient’s Needs

Dr. Parvin Carter

Dentistry originated as a subspecialty of medicine but evolved into a separate healthcare profession in the middle of the 19th century. The subsequent isolation from the profession of medicine has resulted in voids in the training of both physicians and dentists — and has affected healthcare delivery in this country as well.

Harvard School of Dental Medicine

Harvard School of Dental Medicine (HSDM) faculty members Donald Giddon, DMD, PhD, and Brian Swann, DDS, MPH have started an oral physician (OP) residency program, sponsored by the HSDM, Harvard Medical School, and the Cambridge Health Alliance in Cambridge, MA.

The Issue of Primary Care Shortage

The United States is currently experiencing a primary care shortage. One solution to improving health care is to increase the utilization of existing health care providers, particularly dentists, an opportunity that has been largely ignored. By employing mid-level providers for less complex procedures to deliver more accessible dental care at lower cost, dentists can redistribute tasks to their office workforce. They can then serve as oral physicians who can provide limited preventive primary care, including screening for chronic diseases, while continuing to oversee all dental care, whether provided by dentists or non-dentists. Thus, they could improve the health of the US population as well as increase access to dental care at lower cost, while partially alleviating the primary care shortage by filling a need for the screening aspects of primary care.

What is the Solution to Primary Care Shortage?

HSDM’s oral physician residency is an extra yearsandwiched between the resident’s graduation from general dental practice residency (GDPR) and before other specialty training or general practice. Under the jurisdiction of Dr. Swann, who is also the director of oral health at the Windsor Street Health Center of the Cambridge Health Alliance, the residency provides added rotations in emergency medicine, oral surgery, medicine, anesthesia, and pediatric dentistry.

We Need to Improve Communication Between Oral Health and Medical Providers

“We need to improve communication between oral health and medical providers,” Dr. Swann said. “Right now, it’s dismal. Oral health isn’t being taught in medical school, and dental schools aren’t doing enough to have their students incorporate their medical training, but they’re starting to.”

Dental and Medical Students Should Share the Same Curricula for the First Two Years

At HSDM and Harvard Medical School, for example, dental and medical students share the same curricula for the first two years and then branch out. HSDM’s OP residents learn from medical staff of the Cambridge Health Alliance and share their oral health knowledge with their medical colleagues. Because GDPR programs are generally hospital-affiliated, they allow for better integration of medical and oral health services during training.

Bottom Line:

Our dental education should be changed. We should obtain an extra two years of education and get a degree as a general physician and then specialize in dentistry. The length of education would not be a lot longer. This would  improve the health of the US population as well as increase access to dental care at lower cost, while partially alleviating the primary care shortage by filling a need for the screening aspects of primary care.

Schedule an appointment before end f the (4)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In dentistry experience and Continuing Education are everything. Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in Practicing General Dentistry and 25 years in Orthodontics. She has thousands of hours of advanced training. In 2000, Academy of General Dentistry awarded Dr. Carter a Certificate of Mastership (MAGD) in General Dentistry. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement. Dr. Carter is a Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 380 patients with Invisalign.

How to Respond to Patients Needs

Dr. Parvin Carter

Dentistry originated as a subspecialty of medicine but evolved into a separate healthcare profession in the middle of the 19th century. The subsequent isolation from the profession of medicine has resulted in voids in the training of both physicians and dentists — and has affected healthcare delivery in this country as well.

Harvard School of Dental Medicine

Harvard School of Dental Medicine (HSDM) faculty members Donald Giddon, DMD, PhD, and Brian Swann, DDS, MPH have started an oral physician (OP) residency program, sponsored by the HSDM, Harvard Medical School, and the Cambridge Health Alliance in Cambridge, MA.

The Issue of Primary Care Shortage

The United States is currently experiencing a primary care shortage. One solution to improving health care is to increase the utilization of existing health care providers, particularly dentists, an opportunity that has been largely ignored. By employing mid-level providers for less complex procedures to deliver more accessible dental care at lower cost, dentists can redistribute tasks to their office workforce. They can then serve as oral physicians who can provide limited preventive primary care, including screening for chronic diseases, while continuing to oversee all dental care, whether provided by dentists or non-dentists. Thus, they could improve the health of the US population as well as increase access to dental care at lower cost, while partially alleviating the primary care shortage by filling a need for the screening aspects of primary care.

What is the Solution to Primary Care Shortage?

HSDM’s oral physician residency is an extra year, sandwiched between the resident’s graduation from general dental practice residency (GDPR) and before other specialty training or general practice. Under the jurisdiction of Dr. Swann, who is also the director of oral health at the Windsor Street Health Center of the Cambridge Health Alliance, the residency provides added rotations in emergency medicine, oral surgery, medicine, anesthesia, and pediatric dentistry.

We Need to Improve Communication Between Oral Health and Medical Providers

“We need to improve communication between oral health and medical providers,” Dr. Swann said. “Right now, it’s dismal. Oral health isn’t being taught in medical school, and dental schools aren’t doing enough to have their students incorporate their medical training, but they’re starting to.”

Dental and Medical Students Should Share the Same Curricula for the First Two Years

At HSDM and Harvard Medical School, for example, dental and medical students share the same curricula for the first two years and then branch out. HSDM’s OP residents learn from medical staff of the Cambridge Health Alliance and share their oral health knowledge with their medical colleagues. Because GDPR programs are generally hospital-affiliated, they allow for better integration of medical and oral health services during training.

Bottom Line:

Our dental education should be changed. We should obtain an extra two years of education and get a degree as a general physician and then specialize in dentistry. The length of education would not be a lot longer. This would  improve the health of the US population as well as increase access to dental care at lower cost, while partially alleviating the primary care shortage by filling a need for the screening aspects of primary care. We need to be thinking of our patients needs.

Click on the picture below to learn more about Dr. Parvin Carter and the office!

TESTIMONIAL VIDEO CLIP

In dentistry experience and Continuing Education are everything. Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in Practicing General Dentistry and 25 years in Orthodontics. She has thousands of hours of advanced training. In 2000, Academy of General Dentistry awarded Dr. Carter a Certificate of Mastership (MAGD) in General Dentistry. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement. Dr. Carter is a Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 355 patients with Invisalign.

Schedule an appointment before end f the (4)

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How to Reduce Stress Before a Visit to the Dentist

Dr. Parvin Carter

No body likes to go to the dentist. But for some people, the problems run deeper and form a phobia. The causes of dental phobia can be many and varied.Sometimes, one of the biggest challenges that a dentist has is when a patient with a phobia cannot necessarily articulate where their fear comes from. This makes the phobia more difficult to understand and manage, and is often the case when the phobia is based around a long-distant childhood memory.

An estimated 40 million Americans avoid the dentist because of fear and anxiety.

For many patients the secret to managing their dental fear or phobia is as simple as finding a dentist that they feel comfortable with. In modern practices, most dentists will be trained to support patients suffering from stress,anxiety or fear, whether that involves consultation, communication, distraction or behavior management. Often,especially if it is a patient suffering from a fear of the unknown, a dentist who does not take the time to explain procedures and to ensure that their patient feels comfortable with them, will only worry the patient more. This can lead to the kind of behavior where patients worry more and more and then feel less and less comfortable visiting the dentist as time goes on.

A good dentist will begin building a relationship at consultation stage which means that their patients trust them, understand them and know what their treatment involves.In many cases the initial consultation is the start of the solution, not simply so we understand your fear more but also so you get to know your dentist and relax more.

How to Reduce Stress Before a Visit

 1. Listen to Relaxing Music

This is my number one strategy for managing anxiety and pain in the dental chair.  Take noise canceling headphones and plug them into your ipod. Create a playlist ahead of time filled with relaxing music.

2. Practice Segmented Breathing

Keeping your breathing steady tricks your body into relaxing even in an environment your mind may be saying is stressful.  Although having your mouth open limits your pranayama options, you can easily keep your breathing segmented, that is divided into equal parts.  Try inhaling for four seconds and exhaling for four seconds through the nose.  After a few minutes, you will feel much more relaxed.

3. Plan to  Bring a friend or a family member with you .

Make sure this person is comfortable with dentists and not the high-strung sort.

4. Think positive!

Remember–when you get through this, you will prove to yourself you are a strong person, who takes care of your body. This will be over soon–and don’t forget to reward yourself!

5. Ask your dentist for oral sedation.

This is a medical procedure involving the administration of oral sedative drugs, generally to facilitate a dental procedure and reduce patients fear and anxiety related to the experience. Oral sedation is one of the available methods of conscious sedation dentistry., along with inhalation sedation (nitrous oxide) and conscious intravenous sedation

  • Anesthetics are not 100% effective for 100% of the population. If pain is your fear, be very clear up front in communicating this to your doctor, along with your past experiences. Don’t be afraid to dentist-shop until you find one willing to work with you. If your dentist doesn’t take your past dental pain experiences seriously, find another dentist.
  • Nitrous oxide, or “laughing gas” is widely used in most dental practices and will relax you as well as heighten your pain threshold. If you are too nervous about Intravenous sedation, and nervous about the dental work, consult your dentist about this option. It is done by simply putting a nose mask on and breathing through your nose. Depending on the procedure, different amounts of nitrous oxide will be administered for the appropriate time.
  • Here is a tip from a terrified patient: Some professionals will not admit that some patients can’t be numbed adequately. This is a fact. If your dentist doesn’t believe this and pain is your issue, find another dentist who’s willing to work with you.
  • Dentistry has come a long way. There is very little, if any, pain associated with any procedure performed at a dental office. The anesthetics used for injections are profound and should completely numb the area being worked on. There is even an anesthetic used before the injection so you are already numb before you even get the shot that numbs you!

In dentistry experience and Continuing Education are everything. Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in Practicing General Dentistry and 25 years in Orthodontics. She has thousands of hours of advanced training. In 2000, Academy of General Dentistry awarded Dr. Carter a Certificate of Mastership (MAGD) in General Dentistry. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement. Dr. Carter is a Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 371 patients with Invisalign

Web Site The Doctor Invisalign Dental Services Testimonial Hours
Appointment Education Feed Back Refer Us Contact Us Mobile Web

Winner Of Our Patient Loyalty Reward

Dr. Parvin Carter

During the past few months every time you visited our office , we asked you to enter your name and e-mail address to win a brand new 23 inch computer monitor.

Here is the name of the winner of our Patient Loyalty Reward:

Rebecca Seigle 

Please make sure to enter your name and e-mail address next time you visit our practice to win our next Patient Loyalty Reward.

In dentistry experience and Continuing Education are everything. Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in Practicing General Dentistry and 25 years in Orthodontics. She has thousands of hours of advanced training. In 2000, Academy of General Dentistry awarded Dr. Carter a Certificate of Mastership (MAGD) in General Dentistry. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement. Dr. Carter is a Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 320 patients with Invisalign.

How to choose a Dentist ?

Dr. Parvin Carter

Your mouth is more than just a beautiful smile; it is the
gateway to your body and your health. Your oral ecology,
including cleanings, previous dental work, fillings, extractions, root canals and
cavitations are serious subjects that deserve thoughtful and well-informed
consideration. Your teeth, gums, jaw bone, lips, palate, tongue and cheeks are
intimately connected with the rest of your body so it is important that you find an
intelligent and compassionate dentist who practices with the leading edge of optimal
dental options and will help you decide with discernment.The American Dental Association offers these suggestions for choosing your dentist:

  • Ask family, friends, neighbors or co-workers for recommendations.
  • Ask your family physician or local pharmacist.
  • If you’re moving, your current dentist may be able to make a recommendation.
  • Call or write your local or state dental society. Your local and state dental societies also may be listed in the telephone directory under “dentists” or “associations.”
  • Use ADA.org’s ADA Member Directory to search for dentists in your area.

When you have a list of prospective dentist call and visit several before making an appointment.Just see how clean the office is, how personable staffs are and check the record of dentist’s achievements and continuing education.

Your dentist has a duty to communicate truthfully.

This principle expresses the concept that professionals have a duty to be honest and trustworthy in their dealings with people. Under this principle, the dentist’s primary obligations include respecting the position of trust inherent in the dentist-patient relationship, communicating truthfully and without deception, and maintaining intellectual integrity.

 

In dentistry experience and Continuing Education are everything. Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in Practicing General Dentistry and 25 years in Orthodontics. She has thousands of hours of advanced training. In 2000, Academy of General Dentistry awarded Dr. Carter a Certificate of Mastership (MAGD) in General Dentistry. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement. Dr. Carter is a Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 300 patients with Invisalign.

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