Our Second Free Dental Day

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June 25, 2014 was an exciting day for me: I was honored to get to serve my community members who had great need for oral health and could not afford it. As early as April 1, 2014, I made the following announcement on my Facebook:

“My dental office will see, free of charge, as many patients as possible starting at 9 a.m. on June 25. The event operates on a first come, first serve basis for oral cancer screenings, and a choice of an extraction, filling or cleaning. Please come to our dental office, located on 1548East St., across from Shasta Regional Hospital on June 25. Please share this to help someone who needs dental care and cannot afford it.”

On our second Free Dental Day there was huge line of more than thirty people waiting since 4:00 AM.

On the morning of June 25, at 9:00 AM my staff and I went out to greet people waiting in line. There was huge line of more than thirty people waiting. Some said they were in line since 4:00AM. My office parking lots, as well as parking lot next door, were fully

On our second Free Dental Day there was huge line of more than thirty people waiting since 4:00 AM.

On the morning of June 25, at 9:00 AM my staff and I went out to greet people waiting in line. There was huge line of more than thirty people waiting. Some said they were in line since 4:00AM. My office parking lots, as well as parking lot next door, were fully packed.

Extra Help

On our second Free Dental Day, I had employed extra help to be able to serve as many people as possible

I had hired extra help to be able to serve as many people as possible. Throughout the day, my staff and I were all running. We were trying to accommodate all the people who had waited patiently, some over 12 hours. There were young, old, teenagers, and children among them. They were badly in need of dental care, which was overdue for years.

extra help

Many people were badly in need of dental care, which was overdue for years.

Many people were badly in need of dental care, which was overdue for years.

You could not believe how many times my staff and I cried for the pain and suffering they had gone through. I was overwhelmed and embarrassed with their expression of gratitude.

We gave away $11,000 worth of free dental services.

 

 

Our Hygienist

At the end of the day we had given away $11000 worth of free dental services.

  Some people die from dental disease

Many people suffer greatly, as the result of unaffordable Healthcare costs.

According to Harvard Gazette, one person dies every 12 minutes (45,000 deaths annually) from un-affordable Healthcare costs. Healthcare is a huge topic – let’s just consider Dental care.

People don’t realize that dental disease can cause serious illness. The problems are not just cosmetic. Many people die from dental disease.

According to NBC affiliate WLWT, a 24 year old man, Kyle Willis, died because of his infected tooth. Kyle’s tooth started hurting two weeks before his death. When he went to dentist, dentists told him his tooth needed to be pulled; he decided to forgo the procedure, because he was unemployed and had no insurance. When his face started swelling and his head began to ache, Willis went to the emergency room, where he received prescriptions for antibiotics and pain medications. Willis couldn’t afford both, so he chose the pain medications. The tooth infection spread, causing his brain to swell. He died as a result.

 

Between 30 and 50 percent of the population have the most serious dental disease

When people are unemployed or don’t have insurance, where do they go? What do they do? People end up dying from the most treatable diseases in the world.

According to  PBS: “More than 100 million Americans don’t go to the dentist because they can’t afford it. Many end up in severe pain and sometimes they even die!”

According to Dr. Tom McGuire , Dental disease is an epidemic. Ninety percent of the population suffers from some form of this disease. Between 30 and 50 percent of the population have the most serious forms of dental

People want to believe there’s a safety net that catches all of these people, and there isn’t.

More than 2.1 million people, with tooth aches go to emergency rooms

Emergency room visits for dental health have doubled from about a decade ago.  Nationally, more than 2.1 million people, the vast majority of them adults, showed up in emergency rooms with dental pain in 2010 — that’s double the number from just a decade prior. The majority of dental emergency room visits, nearly 80 percent, were for preventable conditions such as abscesses and cavities.

All too often emergency departments become the go-to place for treatment even though many visits could be prevented with the right outpatient care at the right time,” said Joan Randell, deputy director of The Nicholson Foundation. “We hope that hospital systems and policymakers consider implementing the recommendations to strengthen the community-based dental safety net.”

Many ER dental visits involve the same patients seeking additional care. In Minnesota, nearly 20 percent of all dental-related ER visits are return trips, the report said. That’s because emergency rooms generally are not staffed by dentists. Doctors might offer pain relief and medicine for infected gums, but not much more for dental patients. And many patients are unable to find or afford follow-up treatment, so they end up back in the emergency room.

I think emergency departments should have a dental chair and a dentist on call.

Thousands of dentists across the country and I see patients who are struggling financially and have put off regular dental care. The result is that people are living with infection and pain, and it’s impacting their health and quality of life.

A Report of the Surgeon General indicates that people with low income and racial and ethnic minorities are particularly vulnerable.

 

Less than 1% of dental services are covered by Medicare

Neither Medicare nor the Affordable Care Act includes adult dental coverage, although some pediatric dental care is covered. Even the Medigap insurance that adults buy to expand their plans’ benefits still won’t cover dental procedures. Less than 1% of dental services are covered by Medicare.

Education is Key

Your teeth can last a lifetime if you practice basic dental care, which involves brushing and flossing regularly, eating a mouth-healthy diet, and visiting your dentist and/or dental hygienist for regular checkups and cleanings.

The problem is that most of us are not familiar with ‘mouth-healthy diet”

Changes begin in your mouth the minute you start to eat certain foods. After eating sugar-containing foods, carbohydrates, along with bacteria in your mouth, you begin to make acids. When you eat ferment-able carbohydrates – foods containing sugar — the bacteria in your mouth use the sugar for fuel and produce acids as a waste product.  Acidic media in your mouth can dissolve enamel in less than five minutes. Regular acid assaults on enamel can wear holes in teeth, commonly called

 

Eating foods containing sugar help fast multiplication of bacteria

In addition to cavity formation, eating foods containing sugar help fast multiplication of bacteria which use carbohydrate as fuel. These bacteria then colonize and attach themselves to the tooth’s smooth surface. This results to dental plaque formation. Dental plaque is a biofilm, usually a pale yellow filmthat develops on the teeth.

 

Dental plaque results to Calculus formation

Continual accumulation of minerals from saliva on plaque, results in calculus or tartar formation which is a form of hardened plaque. Levels of calculus and location of formation varies from one person to another, and are affected by oral hygiene habits, access to professional care, diet, age, ethnic origin, time since last dental cleaning, systemic disease, and the use of prescription medications.

 

Calculus formations results in periodontal diseases

A build-up of plaque and calculus can lead to inflamed and infected gums. Mild gum disease is called gingivitis and is not usually serious; however this condition is a predisposition to the start of periodontitis. More severe gum disease, called periodontitis, can lead to teeth falling out. This condition, simply put, is the loss of tooth supporting structures, (bone and gum support).

 

Periodontal diseases can result to heart attack and stroke

Because periodontal disease is a bacterial infection, periodontal bacteria can enter the blood stream and travel to major organs and begin new infections. Both the heart and the brain are some of the most susceptible organs.

“A lot of studies suggest that oral health, and gum disease in particular, are related to serious conditions like heart disease,” says periodontist Sally Cram, DDS, a spokeswoman for the American Dental Association.

According to the Academy of Periodontology, people with periodontal disease are almost twice as likely to have coronary artery disease (also called heart disease). And one study found that the presence of common problems in the mouth, including gum disease (gingivitis), cavities, and missing teeth, were as good at predicting heart disease as cholesterol levels . Periodontal disease has also been linked to stroke.   Latest studies showed possible link between Alzheimer disease and periodontal disease.

Bottom Line:

 

If you like to keep good oral health do the followings:

 

1)  Brush twice a day and floss at least once a day regularly.

 

2) See your dentist every six months for dental hygiene and checkup.

 

3) Eatmouth-healthy Food. Avoid sugary, starchy food and alcoholic drinks. These create a favorable environment for oral bacterial growth.  They also have a drying effect, which reduces saliva flow and allows foul-smelling bacteria to linger longer.

 

4) If you have to eat sugary food, coffee, starchy food, and alcoholic drinks make sure to rinse your mouth with a mouth wash or water immediately after. There is a product on the market that targets only the bad bacteria in the mouth. It’s called EvoraPlus and it works great.

 

There is a definite need to give assistance to those less fortunate. We look forward to another successful event next time and will keep the public up to date with what is to come in the future.

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In dentistry experience and Continuing Education are everything. Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in practicing General Dentistry and 25 years in Orthodontics. She has thousands of hours of advanced training. In 2000, Academy of General Dentistry awarded Dr. Carter a Certificate of Mastership (MAGD) in General Dentistry. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement. Dr. Carter is a Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 500 patients with Invisalign. For more information please visit www.drparvincarer.com

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Wine is Good for Your Dental Health

Dr. Parvin Carter

Cheers! That glass of red wine you pour each day to enhance your heart health or overall health may also be helping to keep your mouth healthy by inhibiting tooth decay and gum disease.

Wine could  prevent cavities

For anyone searching for another reason to enjoy a glass of red wine with dinner, here’s a good one: A new study has found that red wine, as well as grape seed extract, could potentially help prevent cavities. They say that their report, which appears in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, could lead to the development of natural products that ward off dental diseases with fewer side effects.

60 to 90 percent of the global population suffer from gum disease 

M. Victoria Moreno-Arribas and colleagues explain that dental diseases are extremely common throughout the world. Cavities, periodontal disease and tooth loss affect an estimated 60 to 90 percent of the global population. The problems start when certain bacteria in the mouth get together and form biofilms, which are communities of bacteria that are difficult to kill. They form plaque and produce acid, which starts damaging teeth. Brushing, fluoride in toothpaste and water and other methods can help get rid of bacterial plaques, but the effects are limited.

Antimicrobial agents reduce taste perception

Antimicrobial agents can be prescribed to control plaque and reduce oral biofilms, but side effects are associated with some of these, including reduced taste perception and discoloration of the gums. Also, it is possible that the use of these antimicrobials is contributing to drug resistance in the bacteria.

Some research has suggested that polyphenols, grape seed extract and wine can slow bacterial growth, so Moreno-Arribas’ team decided to test them under realistic conditions for the first time.

Wine and human health

Wine contains a number of biologically active compounds with beneficial effects on human health. The antibacterial action of commercial red and white wines against oral bacteria responsible for caries development and sore throat was studied.. Both wines displayed activity. The compounds responsible for such activities were succinic, malic, lactic, tartaric, citric, and acetic acid. The synthetic mixtures of the organic acids tested at the concentrations found in wine had greater antibacterial activity than the beverages.

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In dentistry experience and Continuing Education are everything. Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in Practicing General Dentistry and 25 years in Orthodontics. She has thousands of hours of advanced training. In 2000, Academy of General Dentistry awarded Dr. Carter a Certificate of Mastership (MAGD) in General Dentistry. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement. Dr. Carter is a Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 450 patients with Invisalign.

see www.parvincarter.com for more information.

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12 Diseases and One Simple Solution

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A new Gallup poll has revealed that 1 in 3 adults in the United States have not visited the dentist within the past year – a trend that has stayed mostly the same since 2008.

These findings are based on interviews with 178,072 American adults conducted during 2013 and with 354,645 adults conducted during 2008 as part of the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index. Respondents were asked whether they had visited the dentist in the previous 12 months. Results for all years between 2008 and 2013 are similar.

Poor oral health and 12 killer diseases

Poor oral care can lead to many potential negative health outcomes. Recent medical research has indicated that when combined with other risk factors, poor oral health may be linked to :

 Connection found between poor dental health and depression

Recently Deakin University researchers reported a connection between poor dental health and depression.

Using data from a comprehensive health survey of more than 10,000 people aged 20—75 years living in the United States, the Deakin IMPACT Strategic Research Centre, found that poor dental health (as measured by the number of dental conditions a person had) increased the likelihood of being depressed.

“Not only did we find a connection between dental health and depression, we also demonstrated that the more dental conditions one had the greater the severity of their depression,” said Deakin’s Dr. Adrienne O’Neil.

 Inflammatory disorder causes systemic diseases

The report explained  Depression being caused by inflammatory disorder.Poor dental health, which is a source of inflammation, had not been investigated extensively, before this work,  in the context of its links with mental health.The results of this study are published in the online version of the journal General Hospital Psychiatry.

The diseases mentioned above are systematic. Recent research demonstrates that inflammation may be responsible for the association of Oral health and systematic diseases. Therefore, treating inflammation may not only help manage gum diseases but may also help with the management of other chronic inflammatory conditions.

The oral cavity might well be thought of as the window to the body

The oral cavity might well be thought of as the window to the body as oral manifestations accompany many systemic diseases.Three mechanisms or pathways linking oral infections to secondary systemic was studied recently.

The conclusion was Gum disease as a major oral infection may affect the host’s susceptibility to systemic disease such as disease discussed above.

In recent studies, Gum bleeding was associated with higher LDL cholesterol and systolic blood pressure.

The May 2000 U.S. Surgeon General’s Report on Health states, “You cannot be healthy without oral health. Oral health and general health should not be interpreted as separate entities.”

The American Dental Association recommends adults visit a dentist at least once a year and the survey found one-third of U.S. adults did not meet this minimum level of dental care.

There are more than 120 medical conditions – many of them life-threatening – that can be detected in the early stages by a dentist, including thyroid problems, high blood pressure, asthma, sleep and breathing disorders, skin rashes, bruxism (teeth grinding), HIV, tuberculosis, drug abuse, anorexia, digestive disorders and upper respiratory problems.

In recent studies done by Garry Souffrant, MD, of the UT Health Science Center in San Antonio,the following conclusion was made:

“Looking for other types of disease during a primary care visit with patients seeking a dental referral may create an opportunity to catch undiagnosed health problems, researchers reported here.”

What can you do?

Maintenance of good oral health through regular dental visits and appropriate treatment of gum problems is critical for people with any of these health conditions. You can play a major role in preventing gum disease and improving your oral and overall health by:

  • Brushing for two to three minutes, twice a day, with fluoridated toothpaste. Be sure to brush along the gum line.
  • Flossing daily to remove plaque from places your toothbrush can’t reach.
  • Eating a healthy diet to provide essential nutrients (vitamins A and C, in particular).
  • Avoiding cigarettes and smokeless tobacco.
  • Carefully following your physician’s and dentist’s instructions about health care, including using prescription medications, such as antibiotics, as directed.
  • Treating dental infections immediately.
  • Sharing your complete medical history, including any medications you are currently taking, with your dentist.
  • Limiting your alcohol intake.
  • Calling your dentist to make an appointment to have your teeth professionally cleaned.

You can also educate yourself about the relationship between oral and overall health by subscribing to our e-mail list to receive our educational blogs monthly.

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In dentistry experience and Continuing Education are everything. Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in Practicing General Dentistry and 25 years in Orthodontics. She has thousands of hours of advanced training. In 2000, Academy of General Dentistry awarded Dr. Carter a Certificate of Mastership (MAGD) in General Dentistry. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement. Dr. Carter is a Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 400 patients with Invisalign. For more information please check www.drparvincarter.com

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Can a Pregnant Woman’s Oral Health Affect her Unborn?

Researchers recently reported  death of a fetus in uterus because of pregnancy-associated gum disease. The research was done by Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine.

In another study researchers have also found that an expectant mother’s oral health also has the potential to affect her unborn infant’s health. Bacteria from the mother’s mouth can get into the mother’s blood, from where it reaches the amniotic fluid that surrounds the baby, and the baby can then swallow the bacteria.This can cause the baby to get an infection — either as a newborn, or while the infant is still inside the uterus.

Pregnant mothers with poor oral health have a risk of:

  • delivering a pre-term baby
  • delivering a baby with a low birth weight
  • having pre-eclampsia (pregnancy hypertension)

Babies who are pre-term or have low birth weight have a higher risk of:

  • developmental complications
  • asthma
  • ear infections
  • birth abnormalities
  • behavioral difficulties
  • infant death

What is Pregnancy Gingivitis (Gum Disease)?

Between 60 and 70 percent of all pregnant women will get gingivitis at some point during their pregnancy.

Hormone levels change considerably during pregnancy. Particularly an increase in estrogen and progesterone –- that can cause  gum disease any time during the second to eighth month of pregnancy – a condition called pregnancy gingivitis (inflammation of the gums).  Its symptoms can range from redder gums that bleed a little when brushing, to swollen gums that bleed a lot.

 

How to avoid Pregnancy Gingivitis (Gum Disease)?

Practice good nutritionIt is a myth that calcium is lost from the mother’s teeth during pregnancy.If dietary calcium is inadequate, however, your body will access this mineral from stores in your bones.An adequate intake of dairy products, green leafy vegetables (broccoli, kale, mustard greens) or the supplements your obstetrician may recommend will help ensure that you get all the calcium you need during your pregnancy.

 

  • Brush thoroughly at least twice a day, preferably in the morning and at night
  • Take your time; you should spend at least two minutes brushing your teeth
  • Be sure to use anti-plaque toothpaste to help protect your teeth from decay and gum disease.
  • . If brushing exacerbates morning sickness, rinse your mouth with water or with antiplaque and fluoride mouthwashes. More frequent cleanings from the dentist will reduce gum irritation, help control plaque, prevent gingivitis and decrease the likelihood of pregnancy tumors. Be sure to check your dental benefits, as some Dental benefit plans cover an extra cleaning for pregnant women.

  • Rinse thoroughly after brushing to get rid of bacteria in hard-to-reach places
  • Remember to floss daily to help avoid the buildup of bacteria
  • Avoid sugary snacks
  • Have at least one oral checkup with your dentist during pregnancy.
  • In addition to regular checkups, schedule a dental appointment right away if you have toothache, gums that bleed frequently and cause you pain, swollen, tender gums; receding gums; persistent bad breath; or loosening teeth,  growths in your mouth, even if they’re not painful or causing any other symptoms (Pregnancy Tumor).

 

What is Pregnancy Tumors?

Sometimes a large lump with deep red pinpoint markings on it forms on inflamed gum tissue, usually near the upper gum line. The red lump glistens, may bleed and crust over, and can make eating and speaking difficult and cause discomfort. These growths are called pregnancy tumors and can occur at any time during the course of pregnancy, though they usually occur during the second trimester.

  • Don’t let the word ”tumor” worry you. These growths are not cancerous nor can be spread to others. A pregnancy tumor is an extreme inflammatory reaction to a local irritation (such as food particles or plaque). The tumors occur in up to 10% of pregnant women and often in women who also have pregnancy gingivitis.
  • Pregnancy tumors are also known by several other names, including pyogenic granuloma, granuloma of pregnancy, lobular capillary hemangioma, and pregnancy epulides.

Your gums usually return to normal following the delivery of your baby. The bleeding and sensitivity should diminish. If swelling and irritation continue after delivery or get worse during your pregnancy, contact your dentist.

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In dentistry experience and Continuing Education are everything. Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in Practicing General Dentistry and 25 years in Orthodontics. She has thousands of hours of advanced training. In 2000, Academy of General Dentistry awarded Dr. Carter a Certificate of Mastership (MAGD) in General Dentistry. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement. Dr. Carter is a Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 400 patients with Invisalign.

Did you enjoy this blog? if yes would you send it to a friend please?

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Are You Spreading Cavities to Your Baby?

Dr. Parvin Carter

The easiest way to catch a cavity is when a mother is feeding a child. The mother will taste the food to check the temperature and then continue feeding the child. Immediately, that’s one way kids get cavities.

Your kid could get cavity when you taste her food

According to the study by researchers at University of Louisville School of Dentistry, mothers with cavities can transmit caries-producing oral bacteria to their babies when they clean pacifiers by sticking them in their own mouths or by sharing spoons.

Tooth decay can have a detrimental effect on a child’s quality of life, performance in school and success in life.

Kissing between couples can transfer cavity causing bacteria .

Kissing between couples can also cause the spread of harmful bacteria. Dr Irwin Smigel has seen many patients, particularly women, who have clean, healthy mouths, discover a cavity or two after entering into a relationship with a man who has cavitiesgum disease or hasn’t been to the dentist in several years.

One 40-year-old woman who had never had a cavity suddenly got two after she began dating a man who had periodontal disease and hadn’t been to a dentist in 18 years.

A man who has periodontal disease can transfer cavity causing bacteria to his partner.

Infants and children are especially vulnerable to the bacteria. A 2007 study conducted at the University of Queensland’s School of Dentistry in Australia found that cavity-causing bacteria was found in the mouths of 30% of 3-month-old babies and more than 80% of 24-month-olds with primary teeth.

Mothers with dental disease present a very high risk to their children:

 

The easiest way to catch a cavity is when a mother is feeding a child.

Are Cavities Really Contagious?

Just as a cold virus can be passed from one person to the next, so can cavity-causing bacteria. One of the most common is Streptococcus Mutans. Infants and children are particularly vulnerable to it, and studies have shown that most pick it up from their caregivers — for example, when a mother tastes a child’s food to make sure it’s not too hot .

How to prevent spread of cavity causing bacteria to your baby:

  • Don’t let your child place his or her fingers in anyone’s mouth. Children will usually put their fingers back into their own mouth, increasing the chance of transmitting the bacteria.

  • Don’t share utensils with infants.
  • Don’t share toothbrushes. Everyone in your family should have his or her own toothbrush.
  • Don’t taste your child’s food or drink before serving it.
  • .Don’t wash off a pacifier with your saliva.
Don’t wash off a pacifier with your saliva
  • Introduce your child to dental care by making an appointment with a dentist when your child is around six months old.
  • Wipe your baby’s gums with a damp cloth after feeding to prevent the buildup of bacteria. Start using a toothbrush once teeth appear, and add fluoride toothpaste when your child reaches preschool-age.

 

Schedule an appointment before end f the (4)

 

 

 

In dentistry experience and Continuing Education are everything. Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in Practicing General Dentistry and 25 years in Orthodontics. She has thousands of hours of advanced training. In 2000, Academy of General Dentistry awarded Dr. Carter a Certificate of Mastership (MAGD) in General Dentistry. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement. Dr. Carter is a Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 400 patients with Invisalign.

To see more please see www.drparvincarter.com

 

5 Simple Steps to Preventing 7 Fatal Diseases

 

Dr. Parvin Carter

There are more bacteria living in our mouth than there are people living on earth.Without proper oral hygiene, bacteria can reach levels that might lead to these diseases:

It’s never too late to start to take care of your teeth and gums. With proper care, your teeth and gums can stay healthy throughout your life.

monique_3
Watch our typical dental cleaning appointment

If you like to reduce visiting your dentist do the followings:

1)  Brush twice a day.
2) Floss at least once a day regularly.
3) See your dentist every six months for dental hygiene and check up.
4) Eat  mouth-healthy food. Avoid sugary, starchy food, coffee and alcoholic drinks. These create a favorable environment for oral bacterial growth.  They also have a drying effect, which reduces saliva flow and allows foul-smelling bacteria to linger longer.
5) If you have to eat sugary food, coffee, starchy food, and alcoholic drinks make sure to rinse your mouth with a mouth wash within few minutes .  Starches  are simple carbohydrates and can linger in your mouth and then break down into simple sugars. Bacteria feed on sugars and produce acid, which damage  tooth enamel and cause tooth decay.

There is  a product on the market that targets only the bad bacteria in the mouth. It’s called EvoraPlus and it works great .

Bottom Line:

  1. Brush twice a day
  2. Floss at least once a day.
  3. Eat mouth healthy food
  4. Visiting the dentist/dental hygienist at least every six months
  5. Rinse,within few minutes,  with a mouth wash after eating sugary food, coffee, starchy food, alcoholic drinks.

Schedule an appointment before end f the (4)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In dentistry experience and Continuing Education are everything. Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in Practicing General Dentistry and 25 years in Orthodontics. She has thousands of hours of advanced training. In 2000, Academy of General Dentistry awarded Dr. Carter a Certificate of Mastership (MAGD) in General Dentistry. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement. Dr. Carter is a Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 380 patients with Invisalign.

Did you enjoy this blog? if yes would you send it to a friend please?

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How to Save Money With the Dentist

Dr. Parvin Carter

Your teeth can last a lifetime if you practice basic dental care, which involves brushing, flossing regularly, eating a mouth-healthy diet, and visiting your dentist and/or dental hygienist for regular checkups and cleanings. Taking care of your teeth means that you don’t have to go to the dentist as much, which in turn saves you money.

The problem is that most of us are not familiar with ‘mouth-healthy diet”.

Changes begin in your mouth the minute you start to eat certain foods. After eating sugar containing foods, carbohydrates,  Bacteria in your mouth make acids. When you eat fermentable carbohydrates – foods containing sugar — the bacteria in your mouth use the sugar for fuel and produce acids as a waste product.  Acidic media in your mouth  can dissolve enamel in less than five minutes.Regular acid assaults on enamel can wear holes in teeth, commonly called cavities.

Eating foods containing sugar help fast multiplication of bacteria

In addition to cavity formation, eating foods containing sugar help fast multiplication of bacteria which carbohydrate as fuel. These bacteria then colonize and  attach themselves to the tooth’s smooth surface. This results to dental plaque formation. Dental plaque is a biofilm, usually a pale yellow, that develops on the teeth.

Dental plaque results to Calculus formation

Continual accumulation of minerals from saliva on plaque, results to calculus or tartar formation which is a form of hardened dental plaque.Levels of calculus and location of formation varies from one person to another, and are affected by oral hygiene habits, access to professional care, diet, age, ethnic origin, time since last dental cleaning, systemic disease and the use of prescription medications.

Calculus formations results to periodontal diseases

A build-up of plaque and calculus can lead to inflamed and infected gums. Mild gum disease is called gingivitis and is not usually serious. More severe gum disease, called periodontitis, can lead to teeth falling out.

Periodontal diseases can result to heart attack and stroke

Because periodontal disease is a bacterial infection, periodontal bacteria can enter the blood stream and travel to major organs and begin new infections. Both the heart and the brain are some of the most susceptible organs.

“A lot of studies  suggest that oral health, and gum disease in particular, are related to serious conditions like heart disease,” says periodontist Sally Cram, DDS, a spokeswoman for the American Dental Association.

According to the Academy of Periodontology, people with periodontal disease are almost twice as likely to have coronary artery disease (also called heart disease). And one study found that the presence of common problems in the mouth, including gum disease (gingivitis), cavities, and missing teeth, were as good at predicting heart disease as cholesterol levels . Periodontal disease have also been linked to stroke.   latest studies showed possible link between Alzheimer disease and Periodontal disease.

Bottom Line:

If you like to reduce visiting your dentist do the followings:

1)  Brush twice a day and floss at least once a day regularly.

2) See your dentist every six months for dental hygiene and check up.

3) Eat  mouth-healthy Food. Avoid sugary, starchy food, coffee and alcoholic drinks. These create a favorable environment for oral bacterial growth.  They also have a drying effect, which reduces saliva flow and allows foul-smelling bacteria to linger longer.

4) If you have to eat sugary food, coffee, starchy food, coffee and alcoholic drinks make sure to rinse your mouth with a mouth wash immediately after. There is  a product on the market that targets only the bad bacteria in the mouth. It’s called EvoraPlus and it works great .

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In dentistry experience and Continuing Education are everything. Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in Practicing General Dentistry and 25 years in Orthodontics. She has thousands of hours of advanced training. In 2000, Academy of General Dentistry awarded Dr. Carter a Certificate of Mastership (MAGD) in General Dentistry. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement. Dr. Carter is a Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 380 patients with Invisalign.